Monthly Archives: March 2017

Number Recognition Matching Activity: Free Printable

This activity is ideal for kindergarten or first grade. It allows students to start matching the symbols for numbers with number words and ten frames. This activity is a great wrap up after you’ve spent some time practicing numbers with counters or snap cubes.

Identifying Numbers Matching Activity

Cut out the squares on the first two pages and mix them up. Then sort them appropriately and tape them down on the provided table.

Find Your Family: A Game for Related Facts

Related facts are groups of facts that show kids how different numbers are connected. Some programs call them fact families. These fact families are important because they help kids see the connection between addition and subtraction.

A “fact family house” is when you organize all of these related numbers nicely under one roof.

For this game each child receives a game board with six incomplete houses. A house might look something like this.

Each player takes a turn rolling a die. Looking at their six houses they decide if the number on the die can add to or complete any of their fact families. Every game board is different and there is some strategy involved. You might be able to put a number in two different places and certain numbers are easier to place than others.

To win you have to fill all of your houses before your opponent.

This game could have many variations. The first one that comes to mind for me is making all the families ways to make ten. Or you could only use the numbers 1 thru 6 to make it easier for younger children. I created a blank game board too so that you can try out a variation.¬†Write in your own numbers to tailor it to your child’s needs.

Have fun! And as always let me know if you have any thoughts or suggestions.

Find Your Family (Blank Game Board)

Find Your Family Game Board (Facts up to 9)

 

The Game of NIM

Do you have a pile of pennies or beans somewhere? And a child who loves to play games? Then you have everything you need to play NIM.

The game is ancient and there are many different variations. The beauty of it is with a little math you can figure out how to win every time. What I love is that by changing the number of pennies you can make the game age-appropriate for different children. Try playing as a family.

What You Will Need:

15 pennies

2 players

How to Play:

  1. Place 15 pennies between the two players and decide who will go first.
  2. Player one must remove one, two, or three pennies. They decide how many and they cannot choose to skip their turn.
  3. After player one, player two decides to remove one, two, or three pennies and so on.
  4. The object of the game is to be the player who removes the last penny (in some versions this rule is the other way around).

Play several times and see if your kids notice any patterns. Now it is time for some mathematical thinking. Can you generalize any patterns that you notice? Try changing the number of pennies or changing who gets to go first. How does that affect your strategy?

What if you change the rules and each player can pick only one or two pennies? How would that change the outcome?

The goal is to start a good discussion about the strategy. And students are motivated because the more they discover the more unbeatable they become!